Manners maketh Man

Joshua used a key phrase all weekend, which I loved everytime he said it : he kept saying “Thank you!”. He used it regularly in context when I gave him something and so it felt as though:

  • He was being super-polite, which I always love
  • He appreciated, at some level, what I was doing for him rather than taking it all for granted
  • It was some form of conversation exchange – he would thank me and I would reply ” You’re welcome!” and he would beam and giggle
  • It felt so much more meaningful than some of his other phrases like ” no glasses” or  ” no pants”!

I kept trying to video him saying ‘Thank You’ so that I would have a record to share with others and also, to have a record to keep for myself in case this week was a one off and he reverts to something different next week.

I love to hear his voice, to be honest, whatever he says but this is special. Joshua talked before his epilepsy took hold : he said his first spontaneous sentence in the car and I had to pull over to celebrate it, when a little voice from the back seat said ” I like dolphins!” I spun around and told him that I loved dolphins too. I also remember the first time he spoke to another child : we had rushed lunch to get to a local ‘Mother & Toddler’ group and as we got out of the car I saw his orange ‘spaghetti smile’ and commented on it to him. As we entered the village hall, Joshua sought out his friend, Molly, and ran up to her and said ” Look at my face!” and of course I cried and cried with pride.

Then the demon epilepsy took his voice away, he became mute for years and gradually he has acquired some language back and his vocabulary has expanded over the last 18 months . I talk a lot and so I worried endlessly when he lost his vocal ability as to me, communication is key and he did not have the manual dexterity to manage sign language. Even when he was mute,however, Joshua was always able to make himself understood somehow, but this phase of talking makes me very happy, as he can express his personality so much more easily through language, rather than just pointing to what he wanted.

Given that Joshua had language, then lost it and has now clawed some back, I never take for granted that he will always have this skill : I try to enjoy it while it is here and to record it for posterity, as it is often hard to remember what he was like. I have a video of an excited 3 year old Joshua bouncing and skipping around the deck of a ferry on the desktop of my laptop and for the entire video of two minutes, he is talking constantly and I watch it every week, to remind myself of what young Joshua was like and what he was capable of. 17 year old Joshua does not yet have that level of language, but he is adding more vocabulary everyday or so it seems. Onwards and upwards my son!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s