School Days

I spent all of my day off in Joshua’s school yesterday: it was our parent coffee morning first, which I really enjoyed as everyone stayed all morning and we had some good conversations. We heard what a tough time a number of families had been having and that, for many, there was relief to leave February behind and begin March with new hope. We have no solutions there, but we do have sympathetic, empathetic ears and there was a sense of mutual support yesterday.

In the afternoon, I had a meeting in school with someone from school who is helping with transition, the manager of the new adult respite provision that we have chosen, our current adult social worker and our new social worker from Health, as apparently we will have two for a while! I did not even know that Health had social workers so that was confusing in the first place, but she has been allocated to us as Joshua will be funded by Health in the future. So she and the manager were there to learn more about Joshua, and the other three of us were happy to provide that background information. I was pleased when at the end of the meeting, the new social worker asked if she could meet him so that she knew who she was talking about, that was really encouraging.

As it was 3 pm, I had agreed to drive him home rather than his usual taxi, so I took her upstairs to 6th form. We found him sitting on the settee in his classroom; he spotted me and leapt up and ran across the classroom for a bear hug, eyeing the social worker next to me with some suspicion. He beamed and when I told him that I had come to take him home, he dashed to the doors and began to kick them to get out. I brought him back to gather his belongings and I distributed the leftover baking from the morning  to the staff and then we walked out together, with Joshua pushing his own wheelchair away.We had only sneaked out about 5 minutes early, but Joshua seemed delighted to be coming home and the Health Social Worker was able to see a happy, animated, loving young man and she even witnessed the door kicking that she had just been told about.

I approved that she had asked to see him as so often, professionals decide the fate of cases on paper only and they have never even met the child. I recall when we went to Tribunal in order to get a place at his current school, I printed off my favourite photograph of him and we had a laminated A4 image of Joshua sitting in front of us while we were talking, just as a reminder that this was an individual with a smile, freckles and twinkling blue eyes, not just  an anonymous case in a long day of hearings. I am not sure if it helped anyone else, but I felt as though he was being represented there.So it was a good day at school and it felt like another big step in Joshua’s future, a step away from school towards his adult life, but a step that I felt supported in by professionals who have his, and our, best interests at heart.

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